Project Wales ~ Part 1

Welsh Identity in Design

I put this concept together in the summer of 2017, but it had been in my mind to do so for several years . What I am trying to ignite is a movement to make Wales and Welshness more identifiable in the luxury design industry. The manifesto is to encourage designers, manufacturers and industry leaders to be inspired by Wales and to build a stronger worldwide and national design identity that has a Welsh essence. The first goal is to ask designers and manufacturers to build a top-end product that is Welsh in name and character.

The title ‘Project Wales’ has two meanings, it is a long term project that people in key positions can join in with. It also means to project Wales and give it a platform to spring from. The movement is in its infancy, but I believe this is important and is an area that requires attention.

Part of the project is to have a dialogue about what does and doesn’t look Welsh and how something can be Welsh inspired without being cliché. Staying in the sphere of top-end design is important, as well as understanding exactly how changes in manufacturing can be influenced or inspired by Welsh culture, heritage and landscape.

Welsh in ‘character’ requires clarity. I think it is really important to realise at this point, that making something look Welsh could easily result in a cliché. Therefor I will write further blogs about how to use typically Welsh core elements but in a new and original way.

Here are my initial thoughts on topics for the next few blogs.

Daffodil Yellow.

The Dragon

Leek Green

The Witch

 

Snowdon Lily

Anthracite

Welsh Gold

Welsh Dresser

Dragon Red

Honesty

Welsh Steel

Credits:

Daffodil Yellow: Nova Wren chair designed by Rjw Elsinga.
The Dragon: Burnt furniture designed and made by Kieran Kinsella.
Leek Green: Unknown
The Witch: Black planter by Modernica
Snowdon Lily: Mural design by Diana Watson
Anthracite: Fashion by Alexander McQueen
Welsh Gold: Porcelain by Kelly Wearstler
Welsh Dresser: Furniture by Fornasetti
Dragon Red: Sequin gown by Paula Knorr
Honesty: Art Deco porcelain teapot designed by Gio Ponti.
Steel: Unknown

 

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